Home News

Main Menu

Map to Laurel Lane

News
Public Education about Lead in Drinking Water PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 13 November 2016 16:01


The United States Protection Agency (EPA) and Laurel Lane Development Association are concerned about lead in your drinking water.  Although most homes have very low levels of lead in their drinking water, some homes in the community have lead levels above the EPA action level of 15 parts per billion (ppb), or 0.015 milligrams of lead per liter of water (mg/L).  Under Federal law we are required to have a program in place to minimize lead in your drinking water by March 31, 2018.


This program includes:

1. Corrosion control treatment (treating the water to make it less likely that lead will dissolve into the water);

2. Source water treatment (removing any lead that is in the water at the time it leaves our treatment facility); and

3. A public education program.

We are also required to replace the portion of each lead service line that we own if the line contributes lead concentrations of more than 15 ppb after we have completed the comprehensive treatment program.

If you have any questions about how we are carrying out the requirements of the lead regulation, please give us a call at 570.689.0731 or our water operators, Markey Utility Operations, at 570-689-5660.

This notice also explains the simple steps you can take to protect yourself by reducing your exposure to lead in drinking water.


IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT LEAD IN YOUR DRINKING WATER.


LAUREL LANE DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION (PWSID # 2520201) found elevated levels of lead in drinking water in some homes.  Lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  Please read the following information closely to see what you can do to reduce lead in your drinking water.


HEALTH EFFECTS OF LEAD

Lead can cause serious health problems if too much enters your body from drinking water or other sources. It can cause damage to the brain and kidneys, and can interfere with the production of red blood cells that carry oxygen to all parts of your body. The greatest risk of lead exposure is to infants, young children, and pregnant women. Scientists have linked the effects of lead on the brain with lowered IQ in children. Adults with kidney problems and high blood pressure can be affected by low levels of lead more than healthy adults. Lead is stored in the bones and it can be released later in life. During pregnancy, the child receives lead from the mother’s bones, which may affect brain development.


SOURCES OF LEAD

Lead is a common metal found in the environment. Drinking water is one possible source of lead exposure. The main sources of lead exposure are lead-based paint and lead-contaminated dust or soil, and some plumbing materials. In addition, lead can be found in certain types of pottery, pewter, brass fixtures, food, and cosmetics. Other sources include exposure in the work place and exposure from certain hobbies (lead can be carried on clothing or shoes).  Lead is found in some toys, some playground equipment, and some children's metal jewelry.

Brass faucets, fittings, and valves, including those advertised as “lead-free,” may contribute lead to drinking water. The law currently allows end-use brass fixtures, such as faucets, with up to 8 percent lead to be labeled as “lead-free.”

EPA estimates that 10 to 20 percent of a person’s potential exposure to lead may come from drinking water. Infants who consume mostly formula mixed with lead-containing water can receive 40 to 60 percent of their exposure to lead from drinking water.

Don’t forget about other sources of lead such as lead paint, lead dust, and lead in soil. Wash your children’s hands and toys often as they can come into contact with dirt and dust containing lead.


STEPS YOU CAN TAKE TO REDUCE YOUR EXPOSURE TO LEAD IN YOUR WATER


1. Run your water to flush out lead. Run water for 15-30 seconds to flush lead from interior plumbing ] or until it becomes cold or reaches a steady temperature before using it for drinking or cooking, if it hasn’t been used for several hours.

 

2. Use cold water for cooking and preparing baby formula. Do not cook with or drink water from the hot water tap; lead dissolves more easily into hot water.  Do not use water from the hot water tap to make baby formula.


3. Do not boil water to remove lead. Boiling water will not reduce lead.

 

4. Look for alternative sources or treatment of water. You may want to consider purchasing bottled water or a water filter. Read the package to be sure the filter is approved to reduce lead or contact NSF International at 800-NSF-8010 or www.nsf.org for information on performance standards for water filters. Be sure to maintain and replace a filter device in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions to protect water quality.

 

5. Test your water for lead. Call us at 570.689.0731 to find out how to get your water tested for lead.  State approved laboratories in our area that you can have your water tested for lead are:  Kirby Health Center at 570.823.540 and Princeton Analytical Laboratory at 570.209.7916.


6. Get your child’s blood tested. Contact your local health department or healthcare provider to find out how you can get your child tested for lead, if you are concerned about exposure.


7. Identify and replace plumbing fixtures containing lead. New brass faucets, fittings, and valves, including those advertised as “lead-free,” may contribute lead to drinking water. The law currently allows end-use brass fixtures, such as faucets, with up to 8% lead to be labeled as “lead-free.”


WHAT HAPPENED? WHAT IS BEING DONE?

During our current monitoring period for lead and copper, our system exceeded the Lead Action Level of 15 parts per billion (ppb) or 0.015 milligrams of lead per liter of water (mg/L.  Out of ten samples, two sites exceeded the lead action level.

We have collected the samples required by DEP due to this exceedance and are in the process of completing other necessary items required under the Pennsylvania Lead and Copper Rule, Subchapter K of Title 25 Pa. Code 109.

Additionally, we will be conducting special lead and copper monitoring which consists of two consecutive, six-month periods of lead and copper samples during the monitoring period of January-June 2017 and July-December 2017.


FOR MORE INFORMATION:

You may call us at 570.689.0731.  Additionally, for more information on reducing lead exposure around your home and the health effects of lead, visit EPA’s Web site at www.epa.gov/lead, or contact your health care provider.

Last Updated on Monday, 14 November 2016 01:25
 
Neighborhood Watch PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 18 October 2009 04:44

For Information regarding the 2016 Lead and Copper Water Testing results, please click on the link for News at the top of the front page.  Thank you.

 

Now Forming for LLDA

If interested in supporting

our activities,

CALL: 570-510-4071 or

EMAIL: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Last Updated on Monday, 14 November 2016 01:32
 


Newsflash

Neighborhood Watch

For Information regarding the 2016 Lead and Copper Water Testing results, please click on the link for News at the top of the front page.  Thank you.

 

Now Forming for LLDA

If interested in supporting

our activities,

CALL: 570-510-4071 or

EMAIL: willing1@ptd.net